Assemblies of God SearchSite GuideStoreContact Us
Current_issue
Subscribe
Spanish
Daily_Boost
Previous_issues
Key_Bearers
Weekly_drawing
Conversations
Guard_your_heart
Bible_reading_guide
ABCs_of_salvation
Questions_Answers
Who_we_are
Staff
speakers
PE_Books
Contact_us
Links
Home

Vantage point


It’s better when your wife is with you

My wife, Peggy, and I walk about four miles together each night when we’re both home. When she is away or unavailable, I alternate a faster gait with jogging. We do keep up a brisk pace together but, after all, she has shorter legs, so I can cover more ground alone.

Recently, Peggy dusted off our bikes and we began biking again for the first time since we’ve been in Missouri. Just the other day, she had a flat tire when we were about to begin, so I eventually went alone. I figured this was my chance to open it up and I did so. Then, on a downhill, I rounded a curve going far too fast. I hit my brakes, but it was too late. As the tires skidded from under me, my water bottle went flying in one direction and I was pitched in the other, sliding along the asphalt on my bare leg. I emerged without serious injury (except to my dignity) but with some really impressive scrapes and bruises — the most notable I’ve had in a couple of decades.

I decided that, although Peggy’s shorter legs do hold me back some, it’s better when she’s with me. I’m less likely to fall.

This whole helpmate thing the Bible touts really has something to it. When I became seriously ill in Eastern Europe in the late 1980s, Peggy virtually carried me. For four long years, while I was too weak for full-time ministry, Peggy was my strength. She prayed, worked and held me up. Though it was God who eventually healed me, He used my wife to get me through the valley.

God knew what He was doing when He instituted the family. He cared enough to make it clear in His Word how close husband-wife relationships should be. He has a lot to say, too, about parent-child relationships and the family as a whole. Those with an unsaved spouse or from a broken home; those who have been widowed, deserted or never married; children, adults, the aged — all of these can find significance and direction in God’s Word.

The Pentecostal Evangel has dedicated three issues to this topic because we believe the family is still important and there is clearly a large-scale attack on it today. We must affirm the biblical standards. But we must also affirm individuals who find themselves in situations that are less than God’s perfect plan. God has not deserted them and neither must the church.

I’m thankful for God’s plan. I’m better when my wife is with me. We’re all better when we heed God’s direction for the family.

— Ken Horn

E-mail this page to a friend.
©1999-2009 General Council of the Assemblies of God