Assemblies of God SearchSite GuideStoreContact Us
Current_issue
Subscribe
Spanish
Daily_Boost
Previous_issues
Key_Bearers
Weekly_drawing
Conversations
Guard_your_heart
Bible_reading_guide
ABCs_of_salvation
Questions_Answers
Who_we_are
Staff
speakers
PE_Books
Contact_us
Links
Home

Stanley Horton
12.20.09

Wes Bartel
12.13.09

Jason Roy
11.29.09

Steve Donaldson
11.22.09

Norma Champion
11.15.09

Byron Klaus
10.25.09

Alton Garrison
10.18.09

Ed Stetzer
9.27.09

Aaron Boyd
9.20.09

Eric Treuil
9.13.09

Lynn Krogstad
8.30.09

Lew Shelton
8.23.09

Todd Starnes
8.16.09

Gary Smalley
8.9.09

Rick Cole and Dary Northrop
8.2.09

George O. Wood
7.26.09

Sarah Reeves
7.19.09

Mercy Me
7.12.09

Chuck Bengochea
7.5.09

Jeremy Camp
6.21.09

Kary Kingsland
6.7.09

Doug Clay
5.31.09

Owen C. Carr
5.24.09

James T. Bradford
5.17.09

Marlo Schalesky
5.10.09

Wally Nelson
4.26.09

Leeland and Jack Mooring
4.19.09

Mark Trammell
4.12.09

Chris Sligh
3.29.09

Scott Krippayne
3.29.09

David and Marie Works
3.22.09

Paul Baloche
3.15.09

Ellie Kay
3.8.09

Deborah Burke
2.22.09

Max Lucado
2.15.09

Sy Rogers
2.8.09

Duke Preston
1.25.09

Kenny Luck
1.18.09

Todd Tiahrt
1.11.09


2008 Conversations


2007 Conversations


2006 Conversations


Conversation: Mercy Me

Keeping the Cross in crossover

Nearly 15 years after founding Mercy Me, the Dove award-winning worship band is celebrating the 10-year anniversary of “I Can Only Imagine.” Recently, Assistant Editor Jennifer McClure caught up with the band, comprised of Bart Millard (lead vocals), Mike Scheuchzer (guitar), Nathan Cochran (bass), Jim Bryson (keys), Barry Graul (guitar) and Robby Shaffer (drums).

tpe: In what ways do you see the Lord using the ministry of Mercy Me?

COCHRAN: We hear stories all of the time of how songs of ours have helped people through rough times — songs like “I Can Only Imagine” or “Homesick.” We’re also moving into a new phase right now where we’re trying to do things that are a little more global, I guess you could say. We’re just trying to make a difference wherever we can.

tpe: Tell us more about your new global mind-set and about Imagine A Cure.

MILLARD: We started an organization called Imagine A Cure about two years ago because of my eldest son’s diabetes. It is our desire to find a cure for juvenile diabetes just as fast as possible. When I told my son Sam about Imagine A Cure, the only thing he ever said to me was, “Aren’t there more kids sick out there than just me?” Because of his idea of what Imagine A Cure should be, we started partnering with Compassion International and different organizations to send doctors to other parts of the world to give medical attention to kids who don’t have it.

tpe: What is your heart as a band?

SCHEUCHZER: I think we’ve always said that we have a heart to worship, and if we can lead people into worship every night through what we do, that’s what we’re going to be about.

tpe: Two years after “I Can Only Imagine” hit Christian radio stations nationwide, it crossed over into mainstream airwaves. Is there a place for worship music on secular airwaves? Is it pertinent to a non-Christian audience?

COCHRAN: Absolutely. In the Bible, Paul and Silas were in prison and they were worshipping the Lord and an earthquake happened. It was the unsaved jailer who came to them and said, “What must I do to be saved?” The Word never returns void.

tpe: What are your thoughts on the struggle to keep the focus on the Lord, on worshipping Him, and not on creating a hyped-up emotional experience?

SCHEUCHZER: I think it’s the same struggle that any of us face any day of the week when we’re trying to keep our focus on God and not on the things of this world. An emotional experience or trying to boost our own egos — it’s really no different than focusing on the temporary things of this world in any other part of life. That one hour on stage is certainly the least significant part of our spiritual walk — or hopefully should be. The biggest part is our own quiet times with God and with our church bodies at home being discipled or discipling others. Hopefully, if we’re getting it right everywhere else, then we should be getting it right there too.

tpe: Is there anything in particular you do to stay focused in your personal relationship with God?

SCHEUCHZER: I think it’s the same as it is for any other believer. Whether you’re a mechanic or Billy Graham, you still have to be in the Word and you still have to be taught by people who are wiser than you and pour into people who are younger than you. I think it’s the same answer either way no matter what your job is.

E-mail your comments to tpe@ag.org.

E-mail this page to a friend.
©1999-2009 General Council of the Assemblies of God