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  • July 11, 2014 - Reflections

    By Jean S. Horner
    The other day while walking down a corridor in a public building, I saw what appeared to be someone walking toward me. On coming closer, I found it was my own reflection in a huge mirror. For a moment it frightened me. Somehow a full-length reflection of one’s self is a startling thing. ...



Connections: Hal Donaldson

Trust Opens the Door

Since Convoy of Hope was founded in 1994, more than 50 million people have been served in the United States and throughout the world. Hal Donaldson, president and co-founder, explains how God has used hundreds of thousands of people to help Convoy serve the poor and suffering.

evangel: Serving 50 million people must be significant for Convoy of Hope.

DONALDSON: It reflects the compassion of churches, corporations, organizations and individuals who have linked arms to serve the poor and suffering. It also represents God’s favor and the compassion He has for people in need.

evangel: What is one of Convoy’s greatest strengths?

DONALDSON: I am convinced people want to help and serve the poor and suffering. And I believe God has positioned Convoy of Hope to help show them ways to be His hand extended.

evangel: The Assemblies of God partnered in Convoy of Hope’s development.

DONALDSON: The first time I shared the vision of Convoy of Hope with the leaders of the AG, they trusted that God was endeavoring to do something significant. Seventeen years later, that trust has spread to church leaders, government officials and corporate leaders … and doors have opened all over the world. Trust opens the door for God to do great things.

evangel: What’s a personal highlight since founding Convoy of Hope?

DONALDSON: At an early outreach a man handed me a check for $25,000. I had this overwhelming sense God wanted to do something far greater than I had in mind.

evangel: What’s happened since then?

DONALDSON: God has provided a fleet of tractor-trailers, warehouses around the world, finances, alliances with partner organizations, a team of servants, and more than 100,000 children have been enrolled in our feeding initiatives.

evangel: What role does financial integrity play at Convoy of Hope?

DONALDSON: Without financial integrity, you have nothing. If you don’t do what you say you’re going to do, you have nothing. If you hoard or waste resources while people are suffering, you’re exploiting the poor. And the Bible warns about exploiting the poor.

A pastor friend said it well: “People don’t give to Convoy of Hope; they give through Convoy of Hope.” This ministry is a channel that ensures resources meet needs effectively and efficiently.

evangel: Why is prayer vital to Convoy of Hope’s work?

DONALDSON: Several years ago we became very intentional in asking people to pray for the poor and suffering. Thomas E. Trask, former general superintendent of the Assemblies of God, leads that initiative along with Tom Lofton and Harold Sallee. (Visit prayforhope.com for more information.)

It’s not a lack of desire on God’s part to help the poor and suffering; more often than not, it’s a lack of courage on our part. Finding that courage and developing a burden for the poor begins with prayer.

evangel: How can readers get involved?

DONALDSON: Three ways: First, pray for the poor and suffering, and the ministry of Convoy of Hope. Second, volunteer at one of our community-wide outreaches in 2012. Third, give $15 per month ($180 per year) to feed a hungry child every day.

evangel: What do the next 17 years look like?

DONALDSON: Every time we write a 5-year plan it’s quickly obsolete, because God continually exceeds our expectations. Where we go in the next 17 years is entirely up to God.

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