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Daily Boost

  • July 11, 2014 - Reflections

    By Jean S. Horner
    The other day while walking down a corridor in a public building, I saw what appeared to be someone walking toward me. On coming closer, I found it was my own reflection in a huge mirror. For a moment it frightened me. Somehow a full-length reflection of one’s self is a startling thing. ...


 

Daily Boost

July 23, 2010 - Nothing and Something

By William E. Richardson

He wasn’t portrayed as a Christian or as a good example for husbands. He was one of television’s most colorful characters in the early years of TV.

In one episode of The Honeymooners, Ralph Kramden, played by Jackie Gleason, ranted to his wife, Alice, that he was the king of their home.

“I’m the king,” he bellowed. “You’re nothing.”

Alice gently answered that that made him the king of nothing.

John the Baptist showed up in the New Testament, taking a different approach. People flocked to him from surrounding towns, hearing his message, asking to be baptized. Today, we’d call John a celebrity. In 2010, his face would grace the covers of People and Time and maybe Field and Stream. Camera crews would visit the Jordan River. John would be featured on Entertainment Tonight, the evening news and Nightline.

But John didn’t seek fame. He shifted the focus from himself to the One he came to introduce. John said of Jesus: “He must increase; but I must decrease” (John 3:30, KJV). He was saying, “Jesus is the King; I’m nothing.”

The apostle Paul had an impressive resume. The premier Christian missionary daily risked his life to get the Early Church on its feet. He wrote half the New Testament. Yet, in Philippians 3:8, Paul calls all his accomplishments, “dung.” That’s right: manure. He was saying, “Jesus is the King; I’m nothing.”

All of God’s true servants honestly exhibit that attitude. To do so doesn’t belittle our worth. It doesn’t deny our abilities. But it does credit our greatest accomplishments to God, our Source. Compared to the Creator and Sustainer of the universe, whose least effort is always magnificent, the best I can muster is always minimal. He grants me the drive to do my best. He guides me. The very breath I breathe is His gift to me. He’s the King. Without Him, I’m nothing.

However, as I align my desires to His, as I keep submitting to His best for me, everything I do gains increased significance. If I keep the perspective of John the Baptist and the apostle Paul — more of Jesus, less of me — He’ll keep increasing in my life. He’ll turn my life for His glory into something. Something that will honor Him.

— William E. Richardson is senior pastor of Afton (Iowa) Assembly of God and author of the “God’s Billboards” newsletter.

 

 

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