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Daily Boost

  • July 11, 2014 - Reflections

    By Jean S. Horner
    The other day while walking down a corridor in a public building, I saw what appeared to be someone walking toward me. On coming closer, I found it was my own reflection in a huge mirror. For a moment it frightened me. Somehow a full-length reflection of one’s self is a startling thing. ...


 

Daily Boost

March 7, 2011 - Cancer Free

By Ken Horn

Three months after I was diagnosed with cancer in 2002, I underwent major surgery. During that time, the Lord reinforced several things to me. Three of the most important are:

1. A Christian’s priorities must be eternal. The old chorus “Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus” says that if we do that, “the things of this world will grow strangely dim.” That’s what happened when I heard the word “cancer.” My priorities immediately changed. I look at the rest of my life differently now than I did before. Though the surgery was completely successful, I have a clear realization that I do not have unlimited time to accomplish the most important things — things of eternal value. No one has guaranteed time; we must do the most important things now.

2. God answers prayer. The total removal of the cancer was done by a top surgeon in a leading hospital. It was not technically a miracle. But it was an answer to prayer. Many prayed, and at every turn, God intervened. The medical profession could not work its wonders without the help of Almighty God.

3. You can depend on the body of Christ. The surgery took place more than 200 miles from home, in St. Louis, so Peggy and I drove up the night before and stayed in a hotel. Hal Donaldson, my co-laborer and close friend, and his wife, Doree, accompanied us. But a surprise awaited me.

When I opened the door to the hotel lobby, there was someone familiar standing at the check-in counter. Paul Veliquette, pastor of Abundant Life Christian Center in Arvada, Colo., and one of my best friends since our student days at Bethany College, was checking in. I stood in the middle of the lobby with my mouth open. Paul explained that when he heard I was having surgery, he knew he needed to be there. He and his wife, Glenda, had driven from Colorado. This was an act of friendship and support Peggy and I will never forget.

A number of other good friends made the long drive to be with me during or after surgery. The Word instructs Christians to “bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ” (Galatians 6:2, NKJV). As a pastor, I had supported many people through similar trials. When the tables were turned and I was the one in need, God’s people came through — in a big way. It is a wonderful thing to be part of the body of Christ.

Today I remain cancer free. And I am forever changed. It is my prayer that all people in need will receive such support. Thank You, Jesus. And thank you, church.

— Ken Horn is editor of the Pentecostal Evangel and blogs at Snapshots (khorn.agblogger.org).

 

 

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