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Daily Boost

  • July 11, 2014 - Reflections

    By Jean S. Horner
    The other day while walking down a corridor in a public building, I saw what appeared to be someone walking toward me. On coming closer, I found it was my own reflection in a huge mirror. For a moment it frightened me. Somehow a full-length reflection of one’s self is a startling thing. ...


 

Daily Boost

December 27, 2012 - Two Cheeseburgers, Still Hungry!

By Jerry D. Scott

I'm a man of simple tastes in food. A cheeseburger and fries pleases my palate. However, when I eat high-fat, sugary, or salty foods, I find I consume far more calories to find satisfaction. But, when I sit down to a great salad with the complex mixed flavors of arugula, leafy lettuce, and spinach followed up by a meal of carefully seasoned meat, I eat much less while being more deeply satisfied. If my own experience is any guide, perhaps the reason we're becoming a "fat" nation is because we are primarily living on 'fast' food that leaves us feeling hungry long after we should be full.

One of the reasons many Christians spend so much time chasing satisfaction in entertainment, sex, TV, and endless diversions is because their souls are empty. Many live on a spiritual diet of 'fast' food -- predigested devotional material, 2-minute prayers, and once-a-week worship. They avoid the complexities of spiritual disciplines such as Scripture meditation, silence, or fasting because those things are hard, or just feel unfamiliar. Their relationship with the Lord is primarily based in emotion; rather than seek Him, they reach for a quick lift of inspiration. Their spirit, however, remains hungry for the presence of the living God.

We are made to know God and to be filled by His Spirit. If we do not pursue Him, either because of rebellion or ignorance, we will look for something or someone to fill up our soul! Curiously, when we find ourselves stressed by temptation, pressed to our limits by life's trials, we will feel the pull of "the flesh." How easily our soul hunger can become confused with our sensual desires. On the spiritual crisis end of that spectrum, an extramarital affair we thought we would never consider becomes so tempting when our future is clouded with uncertainty. More mundane, but still of concern, many of us pack on an extra 10 pounds of weight when we are transitioning through a major life change, simply because we try to find soul soothing in too many bowls of ice cream.

The Lord asks us a question and follows with a promise: "Why spend money on what is not bread, and your labor on what does not satisfy? Listen, listen to me, and eat what is good, and your soul will delight in the richest of fare" (Isaiah 55:2, NIV). Mature disciples know in whom they find lasting satisfaction. With the Psalmist they say, "I will praise you as long as I live, lifting up my hands to you in prayer. You satisfy me more than the richest feast. I will praise you with songs of joy. I lie awake thinking of you, meditating on you through the night" (Psalm 63:4-6, NLT).

The Scripture teaches us to seek Him and His ways. Spend yourself to help the needy. Replace accusing words with encouragement. Become a person committed to justice, full of forgiveness, intimate with the Lord. Here's what He promises about filling you up: "The Lord will guide you always; he will satisfy your needs in a sun-scorched land and will strengthen your frame. You will be like a well-watered garden, like a spring whose waters never fail" (Isaiah 58:11, NIV).

Jesus says: "So don't worry about these things, saying, 'What will we eat? What will we drink? What will we wear?' These things dominate the thoughts of unbelievers, but your heavenly Father already knows all your needs. Seek the Kingdom of God above all else, and live righteously, and he will give you everything you need" (Matthew 6:31-33, NLT).

That sounds like real soul satisfaction to me.

-- Jerry D. Scott is senior pastor at Faith Discovery Church (Assemblies of God) in Washington, N.J.

 

 

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