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Daily Boost

  • July 11, 2014 - Reflections

    By Jean S. Horner
    The other day while walking down a corridor in a public building, I saw what appeared to be someone walking toward me. On coming closer, I found it was my own reflection in a huge mirror. For a moment it frightened me. Somehow a full-length reflection of one’s self is a startling thing. ...


 

Daily Boost

February 28, 2013 - Relationships Matter!

By Jerry D. Scott

Have you ever stopped to think that Jesus speaks far more about forgiveness, mercy and love than He does about sexual purity? Often, we focus more on moral purity as evidence of a mature Christianity than on a person's willingness to pursue a life of authentic love.

For example, we may laud a man for his faithful church attendance and hold him up as an example for other believers because he gives generously and lives uprightly in the public eye, even while he is unable to sustain a deep relationship with his children or his wife. We do not see his unwillingness to engage himself with his family as a "sin." As long as he provides for his family and takes them to church, we think he is a "good Christian man."

A woman who is pure and demure, a picture of wholesomeness, is admired by her Christian friends in spite of the fact she has no relationship with her mother and has cut herself off from extended family.

Why this disconnect? Because, we simply don't view failure to love as a "sin" problem. Yet, if we take Jesus' words at face value, the greater sins are those involving our unwillingness and/or inability to love!

We cannot gloss over the importance of relational wholeness when we read passages like these. Jesus said, "If you love each other, everyone will know that you are my disciples" (John 13:35, CEV). John amplifies the message with this uncompromising statement: "We know that we have passed from death to life, because we love our brothers. Anyone who does not love remains in death" (1 John 3:14, NIV).

The choice to live in love is not easy, nor is it simple. If we think it is, we have confused mere affection or politeness with the real deal!

Love demands release of our desires to live for others first. Love dethrones ego and causes us to be content to serve God and people without recognition or thanks. Love abandons self-protection and goes out of its way to be involved in the world where it lives. Can you see now, why this kind of love is impossible to show without the Spirit working deeply in us?

Here's a word from the Word. May the truth challenge us to live a life of love so that Jesus may be seen in us, and so that we will know the greatest joy that is possible for us.

"Love never gives up. Love cares more for others than for self. Love doesn't want what it doesn't have. Love doesn't strut, doesn't have a swelled head, doesn't force itself on others, isn't always 'me first,' doesn't fly off the handle, doesn't keep score of the sins of others, doesn't revel when others grovel, takes pleasure in the flowering of truth, puts up with anything, trusts God always, always looks for the best, never looks back, but keeps going to the end. ... But for right now, until that completeness, we have three things to do to lead us toward that consummation: Trust steadily in God, hope unswervingly, love extravagantly. And the best of the three is love" (1 Corinthians 13:4-7,13, The Message).

— Jerry D. Scott is senior pastor at Faith Discovery Church (Assemblies of God) in Washington, N.J.

 

 

 

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