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  • July 11, 2014 - Reflections

    By Jean S. Horner
    The other day while walking down a corridor in a public building, I saw what appeared to be someone walking toward me. On coming closer, I found it was my own reflection in a huge mirror. For a moment it frightened me. Somehow a full-length reflection of one’s self is a startling thing. ...


 

Daily Boost

July 19, 2013 - Infinities Large and Small

By Scott Harrup

Although we don't often think about it, infinity encompasses the very, very small as well as the very, very large.

On the large scale, we might imagine infinity in terms of billions or trillions, although no amount even begins to encompass infinity. Perhaps harder to visualize is the infinity of numbers lying between any two numbers. You'll never run out of fractional amounts between 1 and 2, for example.

Both expressions of infinity came to mind during my personal Bible study recently. Romans 11:33-36 praises God for His infinite wisdom. The apostle Paul took a "big picture" look at God, referencing "the depth of the riches of the wisdom and knowledge of God" (NIV) on the grand scale. For me, such imagery brings to mind the God who creates a galaxy bursting with billions of stars.

But as I was reading Romans, I also thought of God's infinite qualities applied to the personal scale.

That intimate focus appears in passages such as Psalm 139. There, David speaks of God's complete knowledge of our lives as our Creator and as the God who remains ever involved with the minutest details of our existence.

Throughout the Bible, we are reminded that God, who is big enough to create the cosmos, is also personally focused on you and on me. Infinity can pull your gaze to the stars, or point it inward to the soul.

In either direction, a faith-filled look will be a reminder that you are not alone, that you are of immeasurable value, and that your life is full of purpose.

— Scott Harrup is managing editor of the Pentecostal Evangel and blogs at Out There (sharrup.agblogger.org).

 

 

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