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  • July 11, 2014 - Reflections

    By Jean S. Horner
    The other day while walking down a corridor in a public building, I saw what appeared to be someone walking toward me. On coming closer, I found it was my own reflection in a huge mirror. For a moment it frightened me. Somehow a full-length reflection of one’s self is a startling thing. ...


On Your Mark by Dr. George O. Wood

 

Jesus Loves the Little Children

People were bringing little children to Jesus to have him touch them, but the disciples rebuked them. When Jesus saw this, he was indignant. He said to them, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these.” (Mark 10:13,14, NIV)

The disciples just don’t get it. When they had quarreled about who’s the greatest, Jesus took a child in His arms and told them that when they welcomed a child they welcomed Him (9:33-37). Now they’re shooing away children.

The disciples thought there were bigger and more important things to do than to take time for blessing children. Whenever the church thinks that way, it declines.

The lifeblood of the church is taking the next generation in its arms and blessing them.

Not only that, the coming of parents with children to Jesus is juxtaposed directly following Jesus’ teaching on the sanctity and nonseverability of marriage. When you protect the marriage, then you bless the children. There are far too many fatherless or motherless children in this world, made so because parents opted out for so-called self-fulfillment rather than duty and fidelity.

Jesus took time away from a very busy schedule to spend it with children. He sets a great example for us. And He is indignant when we don’t regard children as important.

I like the angry Jesus. He never gets angry out of personal pique or because He has been inconvenienced by someone. But He does get angry at injustice and the way less-fortunate people are treated.

In the synagogue, His anger is in full flower at the hardness of His critics’ hearts that dared Him to heal on the Sabbath the man with the shriveled hand (3:5). You can feel the bite in His voice when He inveighs against the hypocrites for criticizing His disciples for eating with unwashed hands (7:6).

But this is the first time Jesus has been angry with His own disciples. The reason? They were ranking people in order of importance — and regarding “little people” as not worthy of access to Him.

I do not know if there are children in heaven because I do not know at what age we will be in our new bodies. For example, if a Christian dies at 95 years of age with a multitude of ailments, surely those will be gone in heaven — and the resurrected body will not look like an earth body of 95 years. Perhaps the other end of the continuum applies — that a child will have a fully mature body as a result of resurrection transformation.

We really don’t know except “we shall be like him” (1 John 3:2). But, just for fun, let’s imagine the receiving line in eternity with all the ecclesiastical heads, patriarchs, political leaders, kings and queens and princes. And let’s use the idea that children will still be children in heaven. Whom would Jesus meet first? Would the dignitaries and officials be at the front of the line? Or would He first welcome the children who run to Him?

I think the little kids would race to Him without inhibition, and He would open His arms to them. If that’s the case, then it serves us all well to have the heart of a child.

The kingdom of God belongs to those who run to Jesus, desiring to be embraced by Him.

A Prayer of Response
Lord Jesus, I want the trusting heart of a child. Help me also to be alert to every opportunity to bless a child.

GEORGE O. WOOD is general superintendent of the Assemblies of God.

 

On Your Mark

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2013 On Your Mark

2012 On Your Mark

2011 On Your Mark

2010 On Your Mark

2009 On Your Mark

2008 On Your Mark


Podcasts of On Your Mark are available in video and audio.
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